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Regular version of the site

Session 8. River transport in the 21st century

River transport is the oldest transport mode. For centuries, it played a huge role in the emergence and development of countries. It helped establish relations, promote trade, deploy troops. Portaging their boats between rivers, crossing numerous shoals and rapids, dealing with countless dangers and displaying amazing navigational abilities, Russians discovered ever more new rivers. They’ve mastered the “From the Varangians to the Greeks” water route connecting the Varangian sea with the Russian one, the Volga and Kama rivers, Siberian and Far Eastern waterways. In parallel they’ve been developed infrastructure, improving clearances, building locks and canals to connect rivers with each other.

Between 1933 and 1964, the White Sea – Baltic Canal, Moscow Canal, Volga – Don Navigable Canal, and Volga – Baltic Waterway were built. By 1965, the Unified Deepwater European Russia System was completed, the only one of its kind in the world, 6.5 thousand kilometres long and 3.65 metres deep. Today, inland Russian waterways form a powerful infrastructural system supporting transportation between 26 republics, administrative territories, and national autonomous districts, and 42 Russian administrative regions. The overall length of inland Russian waterways is 101.7 thousand kilometres. The system comprises 723 navigable hydraulic facilities including 110 locks, one canal lift, and 8 pumping stations.

The following issues are planned to be discussed in the framework of the session (all titles below are provisional): “High-speed river transport (hovercrafts, hydrofoils, ground effect vehicles)”; “Application of advanced technologies in vessel design and shipbuilding”; “Integrated usage of hydraulic facilities at inland Russian waterways”; Assessing demand for and feasibility of developing river transport”; “Increasing productivity of inland Russian waterways”; “Application of tubular tongue technology for dock construction”; “Waterways’ impact on unregulated tail-water sections”; “Comparative feasibility study for constructing the second line of the Volga-Don 2 and Eurasia Canals”; “River transport government management structure” (to be agreed with the Federal Agency for Sea and Inland Water Transport); “Staff training system for the industry” (to be agreed with the Federal Agency for Sea and Inland Water Transport).

Session Program: BRICS Water Forum Session 8 Programme (PDF, 607 Kb)

Chair: Vladimir V. Rudomiotkin, General Director, Giprorechtrans